Author: Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Protection Fund: Award celebrates work tackling plastics, invasives, equity

Their daily work aims at reducing microplastics and invasive species in the Great Lakes, increasing attention to equity in the region’s environmentalism, helping communities finance water infrastructure, and better connecting foundations in coastline cities.

For this, six individuals from around the Great Lakes region earned a 2021 leadership award from the Great Lakes Protection Fund.

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Enbridge ordered to pay $3M for Line 3 groundwater leak

Enbridge ordered to pay $3M for Line 3 groundwater leak

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Minnesota regulators have ordered Enbridge to pay more than $3 million for allegedly violating state environmental law by piercing a groundwater aquifer during construction of the Line 3 oil pipeline.

The state Department of Natural Resources said Enbridge, while working near Clearbrook in January, dug too deeply into the ground and pierced an artesian aquifer, which resulted in a 24 million gallon groundwater leak.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Great Lakes Breakdowns: There’s a thin line between affordable and not for boat tows

Great Lakes Breakdowns: There’s a thin line between affordable and not for boat tows

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, millions of Americans suddenly found themselves out of work or working remotely, their recreational options severely limited with the closure of bars, eateries, gyms and countless public spaces.

So what better way to spend time with family while remaining socially distanced than buying a boat and hitting the water?

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

What Makes a Region: A look at three definitions of the Great Lakes

Beyond the obvious proximity to the five Great Lakes, what makes a region? The Midwest has its own stereotypes – the Rust Belt has become a popular term for northern post-industrial cities – but perhaps the draw of the Earth’s bounty of freshwater is more meaningful?

Aside from the cultural influence of the lakes, the Great Lakes region is a combination of environmental science, politics and economy.

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Raising Fish: An inside look at how one hatchery is helping to restore native Great Lakes species

Running a Great Lakes fish hatchery requires a thorough understanding of biology, an affinity for mathematics, a solid grasp of physics and engineering, enough plumbing skills to qualify for union wages and a stomach impervious to the aroma of stinky fish.

Kris Dey has been running the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians’ fish hatchery for five years.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Great Lakes Moment: International wetlands treaty turns 50

Great Lakes Moment: International wetlands treaty turns 50

Great Lakes Moment: International wetlands treaty turns 50

Great Lakes Moment is a monthly column written by Great Lakes Now Contributor John Hartig. Publishing the author’s views and assertions does not represent endorsement by Great Lakes Now or Detroit Public Television.

Most regions throughout the world would be happy to have one wetland of international importance, but the region that includes southeast Michigan and southwest Ontario is notable for having three.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Adaptation vs. Mitigation: Canada’s national climate change adaptation strategy needs balance

Adaptation vs. Mitigation: Canada’s national climate change adaptation strategy needs balance

Adaptation vs. Mitigation: Canada’s national climate change adaptation strategy needs balance

Amid wildfires, heat waves, drought and catastrophic flooding, Canada is moving ahead with its first ever national adaptation strategy to help Canadians identify and deliver on meaningful ways of adapting to the worsening effects of the climate emergency.

First announced in December 2020 and updated in mid-August, the government aims to consult widely with Indigenous groups, youth and environmental organizations to create a framework for concrete actions that businesses, governments and individuals can take to ensure the resilience of their communities.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Rising Waters: Great Lakes lighthouse keepers fight to preserve history in the face of climate change

One evening in the late 1800s, a lighthouse keeper named John Herman was drinking, as he usually did, when he decided to play a prank on his assistant. Herman locked the assistant in the lantern room and left him there. 

When the assistant managed to get out of the room, he found himself all alone in the lighthouse.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

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