Drinking Water

powerful industrys torrent of manure overwhelms state regulators

Powerful Industry’s Torrent of Manure Overwhelms State Regulators

Powerful Industry’s Torrent of Manure Overwhelms State Regulators

By Keith Schneider, Circle of Blue

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

lake eries failed algae strategy hurts poor communities the most

Lake Erie’s Failed Algae Strategy Hurts Poor Communities the Most

Lake Erie’s Failed Algae Strategy Hurts Poor Communities the Most

By Laura Gersony, Circle of Blue

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

farms in six southeast michigan counties are major sources of lake erie toxic blooms

Farms in Six Southeast Michigan Counties Are Major Sources of Lake Erie Toxic Blooms

Farms in Six Southeast Michigan Counties Are Major Sources of Lake Erie Toxic Blooms

By Keith Schneider, Circle of Blue

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

the catch bitcoin mining and coal ash

The Catch: Bitcoin mining and coal ash

The Catch: Bitcoin mining and coal ash

Broadcasting in our monthly PBS television program, The Catch is a Great Lakes Now series that brings you more news about the lakes you love. Go beyond the headlines with reporters from around the region who cover the lakes and drinking water issues. Find all the work HERE.

This month, The Catch features stories from “Poisonous Ponds: Tackling Toxic Coal Ash,” a collaborative project featuring the reporting work of students at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications on Great Lakes Now and Energy News Network programs and websites.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

drinking water news roundup steps to ensure safe drinking water indigenous business leaders raise awareness

Drinking Water News Roundup: Steps to ensure safe drinking water, Indigenous business leaders raise awareness

Drinking Water News Roundup: Steps to ensure safe drinking water, Indigenous business leaders raise awareness

From lead pipes to PFAS, drinking water contamination is a major issue plaguing cities and towns all around the Great Lakes. Cleaning up contaminants and providing safe water to everyone is an ongoing public health struggle.

Keep up with drinking water-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Click on the headline to read the full story:

 

Illinois:

  • Illinois prisons have unsafe water, groups warn – Chicago Sun-Times

Water at Illinois state prisons is contaminated with toxic metals and other potentially harmful contaminants, including the bacteria that causes Legionnaires disease, a coalition of activists said Thursday, urging Gov.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

poisonous ponds tackling toxic coal ash featured on one detroit program

“Poisonous Ponds: Tackling Toxic Coal Ash” featured on One Detroit program

“Poisonous Ponds: Tackling Toxic Coal Ash” featured on One Detroit program

A special segment for Detroit Public Television’s public affairs program, “One Detroit,” features Great Lakes Now’s collaborative reporting project about coal ash.

A toxic substance, coal ash is what’s left over after burning coal. While the use of coal is declining across the Great Lakes region, the ash that remains from decades of producing energy with it is a problem.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

coal ash contaminating groundwater near joliet to stay despite residents and activists concerns

Coal ash contaminating groundwater near Joliet to stay, despite residents’ and activists’ concerns

Coal ash contaminating groundwater near Joliet to stay, despite residents’ and activists’ concerns

Joliet, Illinois, a city of about 150,000 people southwest of Chicago, has long depended on a deep sandstone aquifer for drinking water – an increasingly strained resource that city officials hope to supplement with a billion-dollar pipeline from Lake Michigan.

But while this highly publicized search for a new source of municipal water unfolds, some residents who rely on private well water face a different threat.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

how to destroy a forever chemical scientists are discovering ways to eliminate pfas but this growing global health problem isnt going away soon

How to destroy a ‘forever chemical’ – scientists are discovering ways to eliminate PFAS, but this growing global health problem isn’t going away soon

How to destroy a ‘forever chemical’ – scientists are discovering ways to eliminate PFAS, but this growing global health problem isn’t going away soon

By A. Daniel Jones, Michigan State University and Hui Li, Michigan State University, The Conversation

 is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.

PFAS chemicals seemed like a good idea at first. As Teflon, they made pots easier to clean starting in the 1940s.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

drinking water news roundup boil water advisories across region pennsylvania residents fight for public water

Drinking Water News Roundup: Boil water advisories across region, Pennsylvania residents fight for public water

Drinking Water News Roundup: Boil water advisories across region, Pennsylvania residents fight for public water

From lead pipes to PFAS, drinking water contamination is a major issue plaguing cities and towns all around the Great Lakes. Cleaning up contaminants and providing safe water to everyone is an ongoing public health struggle.

Keep up with drinking water-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Click on the headline to read the full story:

 

Illinois:

  • Tribune report shows six of 10 Illinoisans drinking tap water with toxic chemicals; Conte says chemicals found in Quincy but don’t pose serious threat – Muddy River News

A recent investigation by the Chicago Tribune says more than 8 million people in the state — 6 out of every 10 Illinoisians — are drinking tap water with toxic chemicals that build up in human blood, cause cancer and other diseases and take years to leave the body.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

se michigan water main break larger than thought boil water advisories expected until september

SE Michigan Water main break larger than thought; boil water advisories expected until September

SE Michigan Water main break larger than thought; boil water advisories expected until September

By Steve Carmody, Michigan Radio

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

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