research

scientists atmospheric carbon might turn lakes more acidic

Scientists: Atmospheric carbon might turn lakes more acidic

Scientists: Atmospheric carbon might turn lakes more acidic

By John Flesher, Associated Press

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes have endured a lot the past century, from supersized algae blobs to invasive mussels and bloodsucking sea lamprey that nearly wiped out fish populations.

Now, another danger: They — and other big lakes around the world — might be getting more acidic, which could make them less hospitable for some fish and plants.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

shrinking winter update researching ice coverage documenting great lakes life

Shrinking Winter Update: Researching ice coverage, documenting Great Lakes life

Shrinking Winter Update: Researching ice coverage, documenting Great Lakes life

In “Shrinking Winter,” scientists work to understand the causes and potential effects of less ice cover on the Great Lakes, a documentary photographer and three longtime ice anglers reflect on changes to the winter fishing season, and a competitive speed skater reflects on the joys of “wild ice.”

This episode originally aired in February and was one of the team’s favorites this year, so we brought it back around for the holiday season with updates.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

extinctions shrinking habitat spur rewilding in cities

Extinctions, shrinking habitat spur ‘rewilding’ in cities

Extinctions, shrinking habitat spur ‘rewilding’ in cities

By John Flesher, AP Environmental Writer

DETROIT (AP) — In a bustling metro area of 4.3 million people, Yale University wildlife biologist Nyeema Harris ventures into isolated thickets to study Detroit’s most elusive residents — coyotes, foxes, raccoons and skunks among them.

Harris and colleagues have placed trail cameras in woodsy sections of 25 city parks for the past five years.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

great lakes moment new video game teaches watershed management

Great Lakes Moment: New video game teaches watershed management

Great Lakes Moment: New video game teaches watershed management

Great Lakes Moment is a monthly column written by Great Lakes Now Contributor John Hartig. Publishing the author’s views and assertions does not represent endorsement by Great Lakes Now or Detroit Public Television.

Today, many educators are experimenting with unique forms of instruction to increase student engagement in the classroom and encourage critical thinking.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

uws floating classroom being built

UWS floating classroom being built

After a successful fundraising campaign, a catamaran that will be used by the University of Wisconsin – Superior for research on Lake Superior is now under construction.  Read the full story by KDAL – Superior, WI. Read the full story

kaptur 1 5 million awarded to combat great lakes algal blooms

Kaptur: $1.5 million awarded to combat Great Lakes algal blooms

Representative Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio) has announced $1.5 million have been awarded to five projects focused on combatting the harmful algal blooms in the Great Lakes. The funding will support a variety of research and technological projects that are being led by national partners in both private and public sectors. Read the full story by WTVG…

the great lakes lowly sucker is now swimming to the big leagues research wise thanks to a shedd scientists constant efforts

The Great Lakes’ lowly sucker is now swimming to the big leagues, research-wise, thanks to a Shedd scientist’s constant efforts

Karen Murchie, director of freshwater research at Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, and a dedicated group of volunteers have forged ahead with studies that monitor whether suckers are loyal to the same spawning sites year after year and whether climate change is impacting their migratory patterns, drawing attention from the broader scientific community. Read the full…

In London, defence research evolving to keep pace with battlefield

The battlefield of the future may see London-made armoured vehicles on the ground communicating with electric, not-staffed or autonomous vehicles and drones. The research and development driving the next generation of defence technology for armoured vehicles is ongoing at GDLS-Canada in on Oxford Street in London as the future of military conflict evolves. “We have […]

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