Infrastructure

Adapting to Climate Change Will Only Get More Expensive

Adapting to Climate Change Will Only Get More Expensive

By Michael Allen, Hakai Magazine 

This story originally appeared in Hakai Magazine and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

 

As the climate warms, the price of adapting homes and infrastructure to cope with increasing temperatures, heavier rainfalls, stronger storms, and rising seas will be staggering.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Year in Review 2021: As the year ends, I’m still thinking about summer joy… and summer flooding

Year in Review 2021: As the year ends, I’m still thinking about summer joy… and summer flooding

Like many people, I made some really big changes to my life in 2021. One of the more significant changes was leaving my former role at WDET, Detroit’s NPR station, and joining the team at Great Lakes Now as associate producer.  

Having joined the GLN team in October, it still feels like a brand new experience for me as the calendar year comes to a close, but so far, I’m learning a lot from Supervising Producer Rob Green and our fearless Program Director Sandra Svoboda.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

EPA releases $1B to clean up toxic waste sites in 24 states

EPA releases $1B to clean up toxic waste sites in 24 states

By Michael Rubinkam, Associated Press

Nearly 50 toxic waste sites around the U.S. will be cleaned up, and ongoing work at dozens of others will get a funding boost, as federal environmental officials announced Friday a $1 billion infusion to the Superfund program.

The money comes from the $1 trillion infrastructure bill that President Joe Biden signed into law last month and will help officials tackle a backlog of highly polluted Superfund sites in 24 states that have languished for years because of a lack of funding, the Environmental Protection Agency said.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

US requires higher safety standards for more pipelines

US requires higher safety standards for more pipelines

By John Flesher, Associated Press

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A new federal regulation requires higher safety standards for pipelines carrying oil and other hazardous liquids through the Great Lakes region, marine coastal waters and beaches, officials said Thursday.

The rule issued by the U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration designates those locations as “high consequence” zones where pipeline operators must step up inspections, repairs and other measures to avoid spills.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Province doubles dollars for municipal infrastructure

Municipalities received confirmation this week that provincial grants will generally double for infrastructure expenses next year. The money was mentioned in the government’s fall economic statement several weeks ago. But municipalities have been wrestling with whether to include it in budgets plans without a letter confirming it, Meaford CAO Rob Armstrong said. Those letters came […]

Ontario more than doubles infrastructure grants in Huron-Bruce

Province announces investments of more than $16 million The Ontario government is providing almost $17 million to help build and repair local infrastructure in communities across Huron-Bruce. This represents more than double what was granted in 2021 from the Ontario Communities Infrastructure Fund. “The OCIF is a very important program for local municipalities,” said Huron-Bruce […]

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