Lake Michigan

South Haven adds Lake Michigan restrictions in bad weather

South Haven adds Lake Michigan restrictions in bad weather

SOUTH HAVEN, Mich. (AP) — A southwestern Michigan town that swells with summer visitors is taking steps to keep people out of Lake Michigan during hazardous conditions.

The city council in South Haven agreed to install gates to close popular piers at certain times. Swimmers also could be fined if they’re in the lake, though surfers or kite boarders who embrace big wind and waves would be exempt.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Breeze Boost: What’s the connection between breezy Lake Michigan days and high ozone levels?

Breeze Boost: What’s the connection between breezy Lake Michigan days and high ozone levels?

The day was like any other in summer on the Lake Michigan coast: hot. But Charles Stanier remembers the breeze.  

It was the summer of 2017, and he’d been working up a sweat in a trailer in Illinois Beach State Park. A professor of chemical and biochemical engineering at the University of Iowa, Stanier spent the morning checking instruments, climbing up and down ladders, and wondering if anything would come of all his team’s work.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Report: Lake Michigan getting saltier

The Great Lakes hold about one-fifth of the Earth’s fresh water, but a new report by Hilary Dugan, an assistant professor in the Center for Limnology at University of Wisconsin-Madison, indicates they’re getting saltier – and says that’s reason for concern. Read they full story by WXPR – Rhinelander, WI. Read the full story Tags: Michigan, Daily…

Road salt threatens Michigan lakes and rivers. Can an alternative take hold?

Road salt threatens Michigan lakes and rivers. Can an alternative take hold?

By Kelly House, Bridge Michigan

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

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